Looking back: my trips in 2017

2017 has been wonderful for me, both professionally and personally. And it was a year of many, maaany trips. Thinking about it, I’ve been to 13 countries only this year (yes, THIRTEEN!!), including 3 times in Italy and 4 countries for the first time: Uruguay, Argentina, Scotland and Ireland. It was more countries than months. Still, it was by far the most productive year of my PhD.

In 2015, I traveled every month of the year and in 2016, almost (only 1 month got away). This year was different: the vast majority of my trips was concentrated in the first semester, when most of the long weekends and spring/summer take place, but there were one or two trips per month. It was so much coming and going between January and August that I must confess that even I got a bit tired. 😀

JANUARY: Rio de Janeiro / Uruguay + Argentina

As always, I spent New Year’s in my beautiful city, Rio de Janeiro.
And, finding it absurd to have visited so many European countries but only Brazil in South America (and still, not even the whole country), I finally decided to change that. I traveled with my dad through Montevideo, Punta del Este and Colonia del Sacramento (in Uruguay) and, after crossing from one country to the other by ferry, Buenos Aires (in Argentina).

Montevideo, Uruguay

FEBRUARY: Switzerland

My second time in Geneva and third in Switzerland, this time to celebrate the birthday of a dear friend, who even took me to eat lots of cheese and to visit CERN’s particle collision detector. I also visited Montreux, Vevey and Lausanne, which comprise French Switzerland, or Swiss Riviera. A gorgeous scenery with snow-covered mountain tops.

French Switzerland

APRIL: Scotland / Ireland

Easter holiday exploring Scotland for the first time with a friend from the Master’s and a childhood friend from Rio who met us there. We visited Edinburgh and Glasgow and went on day trips to Loch Ness, the Highlands, Stirling, Loch Lomond and a whiskey distillery.

And I visited my 27th country, Ireland, on my 27th birthday, over the long weekend of Labor Day. I stayed with a friend from the Master’s who was an amazing hostess. I visited Dublin and went on trips to the Cliffs of Moher and Howth and the Galway Bay. Despite Scotland and Ireland’s  reputation of being quite rainy, those were beautiful and sunny spring days!

Cliffs of Moher, Ireland

MAY: Alicante (Spain) / Turin + Cinque Terre + Pisa (Italy)

No time to catch a breath: the next day I arrived from Dublin I flew to Alicante for a conference for Neuroscience PhD students. The resort where it took place, by the beach, the presence of friends, and the hot and sunny weather made it seem as if it was purely a leisure trip.

At the end of May, I went to Italy with my best friend. He wanted to visit Turin (a Juventus fan!) and I, Cinque Terre: the 5 villages by the sea, with beautiful colorful houses on cliffs. So we did both! And even Pisa too, since it was so close by. Such stunning sights!! Amongst my trips in 2017, this one gets the award of best destination.

cinque terre 02
Manarola (Cinque Terre), Italy

JUNE: Paris / Amsterdam

My third time in Paris, visiting a friend from Rio de Janeiro over the weekend, in the heat of summer (and how warm indeed!). We visited what was missing for both of us two to see around there: the Palace of Versailles.

I also spent a week in Amsterdam, where I was kindly hosted by a friend from the Master’s, to attend a fantastic BioBusiness course.

Palace of Versailles

JULY: Göttingen (Germany) / Leuven (Belgium)

I went back to the German city where I lived during my Master’s, Göttingen, for a week of work, surrounded by friends. And later I headed to Leuven (my second time) for the wedding of a dear friend. What a special and wonderful weekend!

AUGUST: Kenilworth (England)

Another weekend to celebrate the wedding of another dear friend, this time in Kenilworth, England. There was a lot of love, a lot of sun, blue skies and caipirinha. It was truly amazing!

OCTOBER: Venice (Italy)

A super romantic trip with my boyfriend (our first trip together, and our first time in Venice!). I wrote a post about what to see over there beyond the main island: Burano, Murano, Torcello and Sant’Erasmo.

Venice, Italy

DECEMBER: Rome / Rio de Janeiro

Heading from Berlin to Rio with a friend who was on the same flight, we had a 7-hour layover in Rome. Although it wasn’t our first time there, we went to the city center and walked around the streets covered in Christmas lights. It seems that Italy didn’t want to let go of me this year.

And 2017 ends where it began: in Rio de Janeiro. 🙂

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

I can barely wait for 2018 and the trips that will come! Happy New Year everybody!!!

My trips in 2016

My trips in 2015

Answering the question “How do you manage to travel so much?”


The islands in the Venice lagoon: Murano, Burano, Torcello

Venice is a beautiful destination that attracts thousands of tourists every day. Before visiting it for the first time, I was aware of the risk of it being overrated, but personally found it to meet the expectations. Maybe a key decision was to follow the tip of visiting it during autumn, when the weather is still nice but the crowds are a lot smaller.

The main island of Venice is rather small and can be well explored in 1-2 days. It’s only 4 km long and 1 km wide. So if you have an extra day there, you can go island-hopping in the large Venetian lagoon.

Boats (or vaporettos) are really the main type of public transport in Venice – just like buses or subway trains in any other city. There are 24-, 48- and 72-hour tickets valid for unlimited boats trips, which are usually worth the money (plus, there’s a big discount on the 72-hour ticket for people under 29 years of age!). For more information, check here under “public transport”.



This was my favorite island in the lagoon, after Venice. The bright colorful houses along the canals heading towards the lagoon compose an extremely photogenic scenery. The island is known for its lace, which is sold in shops on the small streets. It’s a 30-minute ride from Murano and 40-minute from Venice.

burano 01

burano 02


Honestly, this island is better known for its history than for its attractions. It’s quite small and there is not much to see. There are a couple of churches you must pay to visit and a small museum. We decided to check it out since it’s so close to Burano – so if you’re feeling “why not?”, then do it. But know that – at least compared to the other islands in the Venice lagoon – it’s not so charming.

torcello 01 torcello 02


While Burano and Torcello are near each other and further away from Venice’s main island, Murano is quite close by (about a 10-minute ride). And just like Burano is known for its lace, Murano is famous for its glass products, hand-made on the island. You can watch artists in action making the small glass figures inside shops.

murano 01

murano 02


The calm and peaceful island of Sant’Erasmo is not a tourist must-see – BUT it’s a great option to stay overnight while visiting Venice. We found the cute Hotel Il Lato Azzurro to have excellent reviews on Booking.com and a ridiculously better price than hotels on the main island of Venice. I was a bit worried that it might be too far (location is a priority for me when booking accommodation), but the 25-minute boat ride from Venice didn’t feel very long (plus, we had a ticket for unlimited trips). The charming hotel compensates for the distance with balcony rooms overlooking the lake, nice breakfast, friendly staff and free bikes for guests to borrow whenever they want. Note: I was not sponsored by the hotel in any way to recommend it. 🙂

santerasmo 01 santerasmo 02 santerasmo 03 santerasmo 04

Other islands

We also walked through Mazzorbo, a residential island attached to Burano – very quiet and not exactly a place that can’t be skipped.

San Michele is a small cemetery island located between Venice and Murano.

We did not visit Lido, on the southeast side of the lagoon, but it’s also an island where some tourists head to when visiting Venice.

So there is clearly more to Venice than just its main island. But one thing is a constant: water transportation, being it by gondola or vaporettos. You can’t (and shouldn’t) miss it.

Berlin travel itinerary

Most of Berlin’s main tourist attractions are located in the central region, Mitte. Here, I put together an itinerary to see all of them in an efficient order and on foot. It’s doable to visit all the tourist spots in Mitte in 1 day, but it can be tiring. Depending on your pace, this itinerary can simply be paused and resumed the following day. Let’s begin:


Attractions in the city center (Mitte):

Start at Alexanderplatz (1), with the TV Tower (Fernsehturm) and the world clock. There are many stores around – including the bargain ones, Primark, Decathlon and TK Maxx – and the Alexa shopping mall near by.

Walk by the Rotes Rathaus (2) until you reach Unter den Linden – the long central avenue.

Keep on Unter den Linden: right after the river on the right is the Cathedral (Berliner Dom) (3) and the Museum Island (5 museums, one next to the other).

Continue on Unter den Linden; see the ‘Neue Wache’ memorial, walk by the main building of the Humboldt Universität (4) and keep on the avenue until reaching the Brandenburg Gate (5), one of the main landmarks of Berlin.

Walking through the gate: there is a long avenue ahead with the Victory Column at the end and a large park, Tiergarten, around.

Proceed to the right towards the German Parliament building (Bundestag or Reichstag) (6). You can visit the terrace of the parliament and have an audio-guide completely for free. But you have to book a time slot in advance through this website (‘Visit to the dome’). The building and the view are beautiful. Highly recommended!

Going back towards the Brandenburg Gate and walking straight ahead, you will find the Holocaust Memorial (7), a labyrinth of concrete that looks like a cemetery, with a very striking effect. Walk through it showing respect. There is also a free exhibition underground.

Walking towards the same direction as before, you will arrive at Potsdamer Platz, with the Sony Center (8), a giant and modern dome with restaurants and a cinema inside. Close by is the Mall of Berlin shopping center.

Go on to the Topography of Terror (9), another memorial about nazism, and then to Checkpoint Charlie (10) – a spot that symbolizes one of the former checkpoints between East and West Berlin while it was divided by the wall. But be aware that the checkpoint is not located on the exact spot where it used to be and today is only a tourist attraction.

Finish the route at Gendarmenmarkt (11), a lovely square right in the center of Berlin.

Outside the city center:

The East Side Gallery – the part that is left of the Berlin Wall, covered in colorful graffiti, is a must-see. Get off at the S-Ostbahnhof station and walk by the wall until its end, arriving at the Oberbaumbrücke bridge. It’s also worth it to explore at night the cool / alternative / hipster districts of Berlin, Kreuzberg and Friedrichshain, which are connected by this bridge.

Other tips:

In Berlin on a Sunday with good weather? Don’t miss Mauerpark! And check out the memorial about the wall, on the same street.

Staying 3 or more days in Berlin? Consider going a bit outside the city to visit the Sanssouci Palace and its gardens, in Potsdam (about 1 hour southwest of Berlin), and/or the museum of the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, in Oranienburg (about 1 hour north).

Want to go shopping? Besides the shopping malls in the city center already mentioned (Alexa and Mall of Berlin), a great option are the Tauentzienstraße and Kurfürstendamm (also known as Kudamm) streets, in the district of Charlottenburg. There, one can also visit the main zoo of Berlin and the Gedächtniskirche: the ruins of a church that was bombed during WWII and whose main tower is broken in half until today.

Going to be in Berlin during spring or summer? Here is a list of the coolest things to do around here in the best time of the year!

Want tips on what and where to eat in Berlin? Check out this post.

Interested in staying longer? Here’s an insider’s view on what it is like to live in Berlin.

I hope you will love Berlin as much as I do! 🙂


The Obersee (Königssee) lake at the Berchtesgaden National Park

Most of the scenic locations that are tourist destinations look quite nicer in the Google images than in reality. There you can see the best pictures, by the best photographers, on the prettiest days, and sometimes also with a little help of Photoshop. So I try not to expect too much when I go visit one of those places. However… the Obersee lake was an exception. Surprisingly, it somehow managed to look even nicer live than in the photos I had seen.

It is a crystal clear mirror lake surrounded by the Alps which makes the water reflect the image of the mountains and the sky. Sounds like paradise? And it is.



Lake Obersee can be found at the end of the Königssee lake, in the Berchtesgaden National Park, in the extreme southeast of Germany, literally at the border with Austria. The Alps mountains that surround the lake delimit the border. Despite being located in German territory, the closest city (and airport) to the park is Salzburg which is also gorgeous! Therefore, I would recommend visiting Salzburg for a weekend (long or not) and go on a day trip from there to Berchtesgaden quite easy to do, even by public transport.

The Berchtesgaden National Park also offers many other activities, such as several trails for trekking and viewpoints. One of them is where the Eagle’s Nest (Kehlsteinhaus) is a house that was given to Adolf Hitler for his 50th birthday as a teahouse for diplomats. Berchtesgaden, by the way, was a place Hitler really enjoyed visiting. But don’t let this discourage you! The sense of peace that nature provides in this park really doesn’t deserve to be associated to that gloomy figure of the past.


How to get there

Take the bus number 840 in Salzburg to the final stop (Berchtesgaden Hbf, the train station). The journey takes only 45 minutes (same by car). From there, take another bus that goes to Königssee. Everything is quite easy to find, also because several other people will be going along the same route. To go back, you just need to take the same buses in the opposite direction.

From Munich, you can reach Berchtesgaden by train with a change in Freilassing, but each journey leg takes around 3 hours (around 2 hours by car).

Arriving at the entrance to Königssee, walk to the ferry dock and get a ticket for the boat ride that goes across Königssee all the way to Obersee. On the way, a guide will explain a bit about the park, indicate a few beautiful waterfalls, and show the echo effect on the lake. The boat first stops at the St. Bartholomä station, where you can get off to visit the chapel and then take another boat (included in the ticket) to the Salet station. From there, a short path of a 5 to 10-minute walk leads to the Obersee lake.

On the other side of the Obersee there is a little house and you can walk there, around the lake along a path on the right (quite easy to walk), and then back. The view from the other side is also amazing! And this house is actually a small restaurant, where you can also find toilets.

Swimming in the lake is not allowed (although some people can be seen stepping in the water by the shore).

When to go

I believe the lake and its reflexions look especially stunning during the summer, on a sunny day. I went in June 2015 and it was a beautiful day, and not very crowded.

St. Bartholomä chapel by the Königssee
Obersee seen from the opposite side to the entrance path

For more photos of this destination, click here.

I hope you enjoy this delightful visit to the Berchtesgaden park and its lakes, Königssee and Obersee! 🙂

Looking back: my trips in 2016

2016 wasn’t exactly the best year ever for many people – including me. The bright side were the fantastic trips that I took. While in 2015 I managed to travel every single month of the year, in 2016 I almost made it (only February got away, meeh). But I did visit 3 new countries (Sweden, Malta and Bulgaria), the latter being my first country whose language uses a different alphabet.

Last year I made a summary of my trips in 2015, and in the blink of an eye it’s time to do the same for 2016.

JANUARY: Rio de Janeiro + Angra dos Reis / Ilha Grande + Arraial do Cabo (Brazil)
My year starts in my hometown, Rio de Janeiro, beautiful as always. And that month I also went to other cities within the state, with gorgeous beaches (including my first time in Angra dos Reis and Ilha Grande – finally!)

Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro

MARCH: Stuttgart, Karlsruhe, Tübingen, Heidelberg + Castles of the region (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)
Easter holiday with two dear friends. We went on a road trip across the state of Baden-Württemberg, in southwestern Germany, going through several cities and at least 5 different castles.

View to the Hohenzollern Castle, Germany

APRIL: Leipzig (Germany)
My second time in Leipzig, very close to Berlin. This time it was a business trip: my lab colleagues and I went to participate in a scientific conference.

MAY: Stockholm + Uppsala (Sweden)
A long weekend trip when I stayed with a dear friend and her family and visited two important Swedish cities. I’m usually lucky with the weather while traveling, but this time it was really impressive: very sunny and warm over there still at the beginning of May!

Stockholm, Sweden

JUNE: Malta
The most anticipated and planned trip of the year, which managed to exceed my expectations (which were pretty high!). I’ve written two posts about Malta: one on general information and one full itinerary. There is not much left to say – it was probably my best trip in 2016.

Blue Lagoon, Malta

JULY: Budapest + Szentendre (Hungary) / Rio de Janeiro + Búzios (Brazil)
My second visit to Budapest, this time on a business trip and at the peak of summer, surrounded by beloved colleagues. I was even able to go visit the charming nearby town of Szentendre.
After that I spent a short, but very important, week in Brazil. I had the honor to be bridesmaid at the wedding of two close friends in Búzios, a beach town near Rio. It was hands down one of the best weekends of the year!

Wedding in Búzios, Brazil

AUGUST: Saxon Switzerland (Germany)
A weekend touring the national park near Dresden and its surroundings, with relatives from Brazil. There is a post here telling everything about this destination.

SEPTEMBER: Sofia + Plovdiv (Bulgaria)
Another weekend trip, this time to a destination that is a bit out of the ordinary. I’ve shared everything about this visit to Bulgaria in this post.

OCTOBER: Poznan + Wroclaw (Poland)
Not even the lack of company stops me from traveling on a long weekend. 😛 So me, myself and I went to visit Poznan and Wroclaw, two Polish cities that are relatively close to the border with Germany.

Poznan, Poland

NOVEMBER: Stettin (Poland)
Poland, we meet again! This time it was just a day trip from Berlin. There’s nothing like doing something different with dear friends on a Saturday, even in chilly (but sunny) weather.

DECEMBER: Göttingen (Germany) + Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
Opening homecoming season, I went to visit the town that was my first home in Europe: Göttingen. It was wonderful to see my friends there again, and to be back in my favorite Christmas market.
And of course, in December I fly to Rio, my first home ever, hehe. What amazing holidays these few weeks were!

Christmas market in Göttingen, Germany

Thinking about it, the general balance of 2016 was pretty positive! Last year many bank holidays happened to be on weekends, but 2017 looks promising, with several long weekends!

Have great trips this year, everyone! 🙂

Weekend trip to Bulgaria

St. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Sofia

As you might know, I have the habit of looking for cheap flights to travel from Berlin, where I live. In one of these ‘treasure hunts’, I found flights that were not only super cheap, but also for the perfect times: leaving Friday night and returning Sunday night. Exactly for the weekend. A rare finding.

The trip was to Bulgaria, for 43 euros round trip with Ryanair. To give you an idea of how cheap it was: this is the usual price for a train ride in Germany (round trip) that takes about two hours each way, if you have the card that gives 50% discount, because the normal price is double. In other words, flying for this price is not bad at all. I called a dear friend of mine who always joins me in these adventures and we got the tickets.

Two colleagues of ours who are from Bulgaria had told us that one day is enough to see the capital, Sofia, where we flew to. And several websites with traveler reviews also suggested visiting the second largest city in Bulgaria, Plovdiv, which is 2 hours from Sofia. So, that’s what we did: we spent the Saturday in Plovdiv (day trip) and the Sunday in Sofia.

Bulgaria was the first country I visited whose language has another script (they use the cyrillic alphabet). Besides this, almost no one speaks English there. One thing that really helped was having written down the names of the cities we were going to visit in their alphabet, so we would be able to recognize them on signs.

It was a slight adventure – but I wanted to visit Bulgaria precisely for being a country that is a bit different from what I was used to.

Sofia (София)

You can go from the airport to the center of Sofia by bus or subway. We found it easier to take the subway, but it’s good to know that the station is in terminal 2, and the low-cost airlines (like Ryanair) use terminal 3, which is apart from the main airport building. There is a van that transports passengers between terminals 2 and 3 for free, but it’s not available all the time.

In Sofia we did the free walking tour, which was excellent, covered the main landmarks and told us a lot about the history of Bulgaria. The tour departs daily at 11 am and 6 pm from the Palace of Justice and lasts 2 hours.

St. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral (the main landmark of the city), Sofia Public Mineral Baths, Russian Church, National Palace of Culture (NDK), Ivan Vazov National Theatre (and the park around), Royal Palace, Vitosha mountain (a huge mountain very close to the city center), Vitosha Boulevard: the main pedestrian street, full of restaurants and shops (and tourists).

Vitosha Boulevard and Vitosha mountain in the background

Plovdiv (Пловдив)

It is better to go by bus – the journey takes 2 hours while by train it takes 3 hours. The ticket costs 14 leva (7 euros) each way and can be purchased right before the trip at the bus station, which is right next to the train station. The buses usually leave every hour. To guarantee our return  tickets, we bought them as soon as we arrived in Plovdiv. We stayed in this city from 11 am to 6 pm and it was enough. The bus is quite simple, but it takes you there.

You can find the website for the trains here (available also in English) and for the buses here (only in Bulgarian! This is when you compare the scripts to find the city you want, or use an online translator).

Plovdiv is full of Roman ruins scattered throughout the city. The most impressive one is the ancient Roman Amphitheater – a huge auditorium built some time B.C., and that is still used until to host concerts and events. There is also the Roman Stadium (underneath the main street in the city center) and the Roman Forum.
Walk through the old town exploring its buildings (such as the Ethnographic Museum) and views to the city center. Near the train and bus stations, there is the Tsar Simeon Park, where a show of the ‘singing fountains’ occurs at night.

In Plovdiv there is also a free walking tour starting at 11 am daily in front of the city hall, in the main street.

Ancient Roman Amphitheatre in Plovdid

Bulgaria may not be one of the first destinations that come to mind when thinking about Europe, but it’s certainly worth the visit. Most of its streets and buildings have a very simple and humble appearance, but there are several points of interest for tourists. It’s a country where you spend very little, and it’s possible to visit the two largest cities during a weekend.

For more photos of Bulgaria, click here.

The Bastei and the Saxon Switzerland National Park

The Bastei bridge and the Lilienstein mountain in the background

Saxon Switzerland (in German, Sächsische Schweiz) is a region and national park located 43 km southeast of Dresden. It got this name because the landscape full of mountains may resemble Switzerland – but it’s actually Eastern Germany, almost at the border with Czech Republic.

The most popular attraction of the national park is the Bastei – a sandstone rock formation formed during the Cretaceous period (100 million years ago). There, one can see the famous Bastei bridge (Basteibrücke), 194 meters above the Elbe river. There are a few viewpoints at the Bastei that allow a nice outlook of the bridge and the mountains around.

On one end of the bridge is the Felsenburg Neurathen – the ruins of an old rock castle. Admission is only 2 euros. It is an open-air museum with beautiful views to the region in suspended bridges.

The access to the Bastei is easy and no real hiking is needed to get there – only climbing stairs, if you don’t go by car. But those who want to go hiking or trekking have several options throughout the national park. Besides the Bastei, another popular landmark of the region is the Königstein fortress. We prefered to visit the small town of Pirna by the river instead.

Entrance to Felsenburg Neurathen

How long to stay:
One day was enough for us to visit the Bastei and Pirna. If you want to see other spots or go trekking, add more days.

How to get there:

By car: drive towards the Bastei Berghotel, where the entrance to the Bastei is. Since only guests staying at the hotel can park their cars there, leave your car in the parking lot of the national park, 3 km before getting to the hotel. From there, a bus can take you to the entrance of the Bastei (and the Berghotel) for 2 euros (return ticket).

By train: take the S1 in Dresden direction Bad Schandau (it takes 30 minutes), get off at Kurort Rathen and take a ferry to cross the river. From there, climb the stairs up until you reach the Bastei.

We went by car and the access was quite easy (we rented a car in Dresden for 22 euros per day). But we saw many people climbing the stairs up to the Bastei. It looks tiring, but it’s doable. The stairs are wide and relatively new.

Entrance to the Bastei bridge
View to the Elbe river

Saxon Switzerland is an area where one can wander around nature and admire the views to impressive rock formations. Dresden is 2h30 away from Berlin, and there are quite cheap buses doing this route. So it’s a very feasible option for a weekend trip from Berlin – or a day trip from Dresden or Leipzig.